News


Tandag City sets Division Science Fair Congress ‘13

posted Nov 26, 2013, 4:38 PM by Zaldy Alima

by Juliefel Miculob 


            “Excellence is not about winning, it is doing your best to something you want to achieve,” said Elvira S. Urbiztondo, Ph.D, Division Science Supervisor of Tandag City during her opening message.
Science enthusiasts from the different schools of Tandag City showcased their best entries for Science Investigatory Project as they competed the annual Division Science Congress held in Jacinto P. Elpa National High School LRC Building, Capitol Hills, Tandag City last September 20, 2013.

            According to her, that despite being an infant division, Tandag City is able to conduct a competition that develops the scientific habits of mind of the students in promoting researches that mitigate global warming.

            Student researchers from the different participating schools competed on the following events: Life Science (Individual and Team Categories), Physical Science (Individual and Team Categories).

            In this contest, display board was required per entry to exhibit the research projects as part of pre-judging. After the five-minute presentation and five-minute deliberation of the project, the research papers of the contestants were screened out based on the mechanics stipulated in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), the largest high school scientific research event in the world, owned and administered by the Society for Science and the Public.)

            Winning entries in both individual and team categories will represent Tandag City this coming Regional Science and Technology Fair on October 7, 2013 in Bayugan City with the theme: “Environmental Protection and Nature Conservation: Key Factors to a Sustainable K-12”. 

The Teacher In Me

posted Aug 7, 2013, 6:09 PM by Zaldy Alima   [ updated Aug 7, 2013, 8:57 PM ]

by Jayson M. Orozco

                When I was a student, nothing seemed more exciting to me than the first day of school. Aside from getting to know new friends, finally I would have had the opportunity to use my new school stuffs from my bag to its smallest contents. But what gave me more sense of excitement was meeting my new teachers. Call it insanity or what, but every time I looked at these people, it seemed like I saw angels descended from heaven. But among these heavenly creatures, there were my favorites, and they were the ones I reckoned seraphim. During our class, I always made it a point to give my best foot forward so as not to disappoint them. They were that special to me like each of them had their own compartment in my memory bank with their epithets on it like Ma’am Square Root, Sir His-story, Ma’am Panitikan, etc.

                I adored my teachers so much. Countless times I was asked if I wanted to become one, and countless times I gave a resounding “no”. For what reasons? Many, too many that I was even quick enough to think of even the silliest reasons just to abort that idea of becoming a teacher. So, when I entered college, I had that long list of the courses to pursue, and education did not even cross my mind. It was as though the whole universe was in favor of me when I was admitted in a prestigious university.  To be at par with those few there gave me some sense of pride and the feeling of being assured of the future. I thought I’ve found a good start so I couldn’t help but anticipate that in no time I would land a good job in an office.

                Life at the university was like a firework at the start. But like fireworks, the spark of excitement just faded away. I started to dread the atmosphere in the classroom feeling that it would suffocate me. The chairs to me had become a facility like that for a death penalty, and it looked like the blackboard had become the Sea of Tranquility. I couldn’t help it, but to me things were just irrelevant, and no matter how hard I tried, I just could not feel the slightest connection with them. I had always been absent in my classes, and that routine had gone worse until I decided to just quit. Yes, I’d lowered my flag, and some said I was a loser. It seemed like there was nothing else to look forward to anymore. Doubtless to say, I became the exact opposite of my old self except for one thing: Every time I looked at a teacher, I still saw halo over his/her head.

                So what went wrong? That I wasn’t able to figure out. Still battling with depression, I somehow managed to continue my studies in other school, and this time I was made to take up Education major in Mathematics. What?! Already,  I was at the most bottom part of the tunnel, and there was no any other way  down for another demotion. And that left with me one choice, and that was to go up. So I took the offer of my parents to pursue a teaching course without raising an argument.  But things had not changed much. I was the same student who was always in invisible mode. My appetite for numbers did not progress, not a notch. The more I had of it, the more I found it difficult to discover the negative and positive in me. At times, I had this view, which was not congruent with that of the majority. As a result, I turned out to be irrational whose values were not permissible to many.

For years, I had my life as que sera sera until I had my practicum. I volunteered to have it in a far flung area. Again, what made me do that was something I did not totally understand.  There, I came face to face with the reality, and yes, it was harsh more than I could think of. My heart sank when I saw those students who had to break their back just to avail of education. How life had been treating them was so unfair, but they didn’t see it that way. They could not care less if they had to get to school on foot, sometimes barefooted, or even soaked through with rain. I could tell in the tone of their skin how much they had to stand the scorching heat of the sun. They did not complain at times they were starved, and the only option was to endure the pain of it. Some of them had to go fishing at night so they would have something for their allowance, and I did salute them that they managed to stay active in the class. Even without the aid of electricity, they were able to study and do their homework and projects. True that they were deprived in material aspect, but it was never an obstacle for them not to learn at their best.

With my day to day experience with my students, I came to realize I was a fool to think of myself less, and how it was so easy to me to just throw my hands up every time I was caught up in a difficult situation. All these issues about life were not unfamiliar to me for I’ve read them plenty of times in self-help books. But not a thing had gotten into my system until I met my students. I learned from them how important it is to maintain optimism most especially in the face of crisis.  It was a lesson so difficult to me for my entire life, I earned every single thing from my parents. I was a big parasite. Yes, it was their experience that taught me that there is nothing in this world that I won’t be able to pull through. Though, the effect was not overnight, still I was so glad that I started to see hope again.  

For my students, the school is the gateway to success, and education is their sole ticket to get there.  With high hopes, they  put their lives at stake just to learn. But hope alone won’t be enough for them to realize their dreams. More importantly they need individuals who would serve as their support system. Their teachers are one of them.  It was then that I was reminded why I was there in the first place. I knew I had in me that would fill in their empty cup, and the thought of it brought me to that realization how indispensable a teacher is, and how huge such a responsibility.  I realized that how I was going to teach x and y would create an impact on how they see themselves in the future, and more importantly how they cope with the inevitabilities at the present. That time I learned to conquer my fears. Despite the awkward feeling, I tried to be the best teacher I could be. I slept late at night to prepare my lessons.  Just how much I was surprised to see my old self. What  I did not understand was that each time I looked at my students, I felt some blast of energy within, and it felt like things just came out naturally. Like gears being meshed together, we created some kind of harmony.

Whether it is by chance or choice that I become a teacher, one thing is certain, God works in his ways. Things happen based on His perspectives, and to understand His ways is none of my business for in the first place, there is no any way I can. Like how a potter molds the clay, God has used his permissive will to allow my struggles to drown me so I would be able to see what design suits me best. For a long time that I’d been there on the bottom looking up, I discovered I had the teacher in me. It was something I could feel in every fiber of my being. Right, many times I said “no” to it, but deep within me, I knew I couldn’t be any better as an individual if I had not become one. Why I adored my teachers so much, simply because I just wanted to be like them. I knew right then we had common denominator.

It is such a privilege to be a part of the lives of my students, as much as they are of mine. I would say, it is their existence that defines mine. It is my experience with them that I discovered my worth as a person and the real essence of life.  It had been for them that I was able to escape my self-dug dungeon, one thing I will   take with profound sense of indebtedness for the rest of my life. I was once a quitter, but never a loser. It might be such a waste that I did not end up in an executive office, but where I am now is just the perfect place for me. In life, sometimes you just have to quit  to start a new beginning. Sometimes you have to lose yourself for you to find it.

 Now I know why I become a teacher. But, do I love being one?  Yes, for it is when I am teaching that I experience the happiest hours in my life. And who wouldn’t be prouder to be one when Jesus Christ, the greatest man who ever walked this planet was a teacher himself.

Life doesn’t follow a script. We know it. When we were born, we did not carry a tag around our neck to tell us what we will become in the future. So take time to pause once in a while, and listen to that small voice within. Who knows like me, you also have the teacher in you.

 

 

 

 

JPENHS Launches Brigada Eskwela 2013

posted Jun 10, 2013, 12:03 AM by Ramil Sanchez   [ updated Jul 2, 2013, 2:54 AM by Zaldy Alima ]

    Brigada Eskwela is a nationwide voluntary effort of teachers, parents, students, Brigada community members and other organizations to do minor repairs and clean-ups on their school in preparation for the start of the school year. This week long event began in 2003 as part of the Oplan Balik Eskwela Program of the Department of Education. It encourages volunteers to give out their time, effort and even donate construction materials such as paint, cement, lumber and other materials which could be used for minor repairs and building.

This year, Jacinto P. Elpa National High School, the biggest public high school in the province of Surigao del Sur, launched the Brigada Eskwela 2013. The program started on May 20 and ran until May 24. Hundreds of parents and private institutions gathered there on Monday as the Brigada Eskwela kicked off.

The theme for this year’s Brigada Eskwela is “Isang dekada ng bayanihan sa paaralan” as it marks its tenth year of practicing social and people’s empowerment. The yearly activity is a nationwide voluntary effort that brings in teachers, community helpers, parents, government agencies, local business and private sectors to clean up and to repair infrastructures and materials of all public elementary and high schools in the country.In preparation for the June class opening, the Brigada Eskwela is carried out in all public schools around the third week of May.

Mrs. Edna E. Trinidad, the school’s Office In-Charge said that every year, in May, parents troop to the school to get the report cards of their children, then, they voluntarily render service in cleaning the classrooms and the surroundings to ensure that these will be dirt-free before the students will report to school on June 3.

 

   

Edna E. Trinidad, OIC - School Principal

posted Jan 27, 2013, 11:55 PM by Ramil Sanchez


Mrs. Edna E. Trinidad, an Education Supervisor of DepEd Surigao del Sur Division, was appointed as OIC School Principal in lieu of Mrs. Imelda C. Falcon who retired in September 2012.

Maam Edna is a Chemical Engineering graduate of Mindanao State University - Main Campus in Marawi City. She had worked with PICOP and the former John Bosco School in Mangagoy, Bislig City. She then taught at JPENHS (then JPEHS). She was the first principal of Tandag National Science High School.

She is happily married to Hon. Pedro M. Trinidad, Mayor of Cortes, Surigao del Sur, and blessed with three children.

Welcome Maam Edna!

DepEd jumps to Google cloud in nationwide first for Philippine government

posted Jan 27, 2013, 10:26 PM by Ramil Sanchez   [ updated Jan 27, 2013, 10:26 PM ]

Patrick Villavicencio, InterAksyon.com · Monday, September 24, 2012 · 2:04 am
http://www.interaksyon.com/infotech/deped-jumps-to-google-cloud-in-nationwide-first-for-philippine-government


MANILA, Philippines — Google may be the thorn on the side of teachers when it comes to student research, but a recent move by the Department of Education (DepEd) is aiming to turn the search giant’s online tools into something productive for public schools nationwide.

In a landmark partnership with Google, DepEd on Friday announced that it will be bringing its email system, collaboration tools, and calendar system to the cloud to help its more than 600,000 staff spread across the archipelago communicate better.

“DepEd [then] didn’t have a central email system — staff used personal email accounts,” related Reynaldo Laguda, Assistant Secretary, and ICT Chairperson at DepEd.

“And although DepEd sent memos to district offices or posted website updates, we lacked a unified and reliable channel to communicate and connect with each other,” Laguda added.

By signing up with Google Apps for Education, popular online tools such as GMail, Google Calendar, Google Docs, Google Talk, and Google Groups will be at the DepEd’s immediate disposal.

Seven in eight Ivy League universities, as well as 72 of the top 100 US universities, use the same cloud-based apps for teaching and school operations, Google said.

And because the tools reside on the cloud, teachers and DepEd personnel will be able to access documents and other files using only their mobile phones, a common reality in far-flung areas with limited access to computers and the Internet.

“Moving content back and forth can be difficult and disk corruption or computer failure is common,” Laguda lamented. “With all DepEd’s content now in the cloud — 17 petabytes of storage devoted to teachers alone — staff no longer need to worry about keeping track of their data across multiple devices.”

The DepEd official stressed that the agency’s recent move is meant to make teachers “lead by example” in its drive to underscore the importance of technological literacy for teachers and students alike.

“We’re delighted to be joining 16 million teachers and students around the world who are already using Google Apps to work more efficiently and collaboratively, and to be bringing 7,000 islands into the cloud with us,” he added.

DepEd is the second government agency to employ Google Apps for use in delivering government services, the first being the Department of Budget and Management (DBM), back in January.

DepEd’s program, however, is the first full-blown nationwide implementation of Google Apps for Education in the country.

It follows the ongoing modernization of DepEd’s facilities and systems, which started with the use of thin clients forcomputerization of public schools and field-testing tablets for use in classrooms in place of traditional textbooks.

Taguig Rep. Sigfrido Tinga, chairperson of the House Committee on ICT, had earlier stressed that DepEd can solve its woes — such as lack of classrooms, textbooks, and competent teachers — by funneling funds to use of technology in schools.

JPENHS sends ‘farewell’ to retiree Ma’am Falcon

posted Sep 7, 2012, 6:26 PM by Jezreel Andre Yparraguirre   [ updated Jan 27, 2013, 11:59 PM by Ramil Sanchez ]


“She’s a one-of-a-kind leader who creates successful leaders” – Mrs. Francisquita J. Cosmiano

 

Secondary School Principal IV Imelda C. Falcon retires this September 7 as her DepEd contract expires.  Jacinto P. Elpa National High School, teachers, staff and Falcon family gather for Mrs. Imelda C. Falcon’s Retirement Day on August 29 at Social Hall, Telaje, Tandag City, celebrating 37 years of her public service in education.

 

                Supreme Student Government (SSG) officers also held their own impromptu program in August 31 along with students and teachers at the Gregorio P. Murillo Grand Stand School Complex.

 

                 “This retirement day is both a happy and a sad time” emcee Mrs. Evelyn Coro begins on the first program. CAT members in blue then make way for the captivating Imelda Falcon towards the red carpet, who proceeds onstage.

               

                “Retirement is not worth ceasing- but a stepping stone to another step in life” Francisquita J. Cosmiano emphasized in her opening speech, implying that Ma’am Falcon is a principal who’s always on the go.   

 

The retiree Ma’am Falcon spent 22 years as a classroom teacher, 6 years as an English Subject Supervisor and 9 as a principal; starting first in Purisima School in Tago and next to Jacinto P. Elpa High School, the biggest school in Surigao del Sur.

 

“(So this is how) Vilma Santos feels?” Falcon uttered when asked about how she felt in the ‘talk show’ with Mrs. Jeanette Isidro and Fe Lagumbay. 

 

Different intermissions were exhibited in the SSG’s program, Glee Club led by Mr. Michael Revilleza sang “The Final Countdown” with the rhythm of JPENHS Rondalla of Mrs. Rustica Galbo. This made the principal teary-eyed and even more when videos were shown and gifts were given.

 

                “I immediately accepted the production of this program..this is my chance to formally tell you all goodbye” Falcon said in her speech. “I arrived in 2003, and now my contract with DepEd has almost expired. I’m going out (in) September 11” she added.

 

Leading a high school was filled with problems, pressures and stress, Falcon mentioned. But before becoming a principal, Falcon said that she was once the Dance Troop President, an English Coordinator and an Education Supervisor.

 

Some hoped that Imelda Falcon’s public service in education would be longer, but indeed time has come. Imelda Falcon’s legacy as principal reigns, undergoing through thousands of students who have become successful persons like her, that’s why endings don’t exist- just new beginnings. 

 

Tatag ng Wikang Filipino, Lakas ng Pagka-Pilipino

posted Aug 14, 2012, 6:46 PM by Ramil Sanchez

http://www.kwf.gov.ph/

Tuwing Agosto, ipinagdiriwang sa Pilipinas ang Buwan ng Wikang Pambansa sang-ayon sa tagubilin ng Proklamasyon Blg. 1041, s. 1997 na iniatas ng Dating Pangulong Fidel V. Ramos. Sa nasabing proklamasyon, kinikilala ang kahalagahan ng isang katutubong wika bilang mahalagang kasangkapan sa komunikasyon, unawaan, kaisahan, at pambansang kaunlaran.
Bilang pagtugon sa layunin ng pagpapayabong at pagpapasigla ng wikang pambansa, at bilang isa sa mga tampok na gawain sa nabanggit na pagdiriwang, pormal na binubuksan ng Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF) ang nominasyon para sa GAWAD SAGISAG QUEZON SA NATATANGING KABABAIHAN. Naririto ang sumusunod na panuntunan sa paglahok:

 1. Bukas ang nominasyon sa lahat ng babae / Pilipinang may natatanging ambag o nagawa sa pagsusulong / pagpapalaganap, pagpapayabong / pagpapaunlad, at preserbasyon ng wikang Filipino

2. Ang sino mang Pilipina na maaaring lumahok at iendorso ay marapat na nakapagpamalas ng pagsusulong / pagpapalaganap, pagpapayabong / pagpapaunlad, at preserbasyon sa wikang Filipino na masasalamin sa kanilang mga nagawa sa nakalipas na tatlong (3) taon man lamang kaugnay ng larangang kanilang kinabibilangan nang may pagsasaalang-alang sa makabuluhang kontribusyon sa wikang Filipino sa pamamagitan ng:

Read more @ http://www.kwf.gov.ph/

JPENHS Conducts Induction of 2012 MTAP Officers

posted Jul 28, 2012, 5:06 PM by Jezreel Andre Yparraguirre


    "Let's rock!" -President of JPENHS Mathematics Association of the Philippines (MTAP) Julieto Galleon
announced in the Induction of Officers 2012-2013 at Villa Maria Luisa Hotel and Restaurant, Purok Baybay, Tandag City
July 21, 2012.
   
    Math Coordinator Nora Pacheco gave her opening remarks and thanked everyone who participated in the activity.
Principal Imelda Falcon also congratulated everyone, marking the association as a "role model for every subject club".

    "We know everyone is alive, active and 'alerty' members of the club, and I believe you are the most talented
so let's be thankful to God, and developing that talent is our gift to God." Falcon mentioned.

    Events pertaining to Math like MTAP in January were also discussed, and preparing now would be a good strategy
in winning these competitions. Falcon also quoted Michael Jordan's "Talent wins games but intelligence and teamwork wins
championships".

    Before moving on to the lunch break and parlor games, Sir Julieto Galleon emphasized the theme of the
program,"The first step to getting the things you want out of life is this: Decide what you want", explaining that that we can
achieve our hopes if we prioritize one thing at a time.

    The whole of this program would truly make a huge difference on various school groups of JPENHS, and be an example
of an organized subject club.       

Education Gets Biggest Budget Allocation

posted Jul 11, 2012, 11:07 PM by Ramil Sanchez   [ updated Jul 11, 2012, 11:09 PM ]

Manila Bulletin Online
By MADEL R. SABATER
July 10, 2012, 7:17pm

MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Education (DepEd) gets the biggest allocation in the proposed P2.006-trillion national budget for 2013 as the Aquino administration aims to solve the shortage in teachers and classrooms by next year, according to Department of Budget and Management (DBM) Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad.

The DepEd gets P292.7 billion for 2013, or P55.9-billion more than its P238.8-billion budget this year.

“Next year, for the first time in Philippine history, we provided enough budget to the DepEd to hire 61,510 teachers,” Abad said in a press briefing in the Palace yesterday.

The construction and rehabilitation of 31,789 classrooms will “finally close the teacher and classroom gap,” said Abad.

Following the DepEd in terms of budget allocation are: the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) with P152.9-billion; Department of National Defense (DND), P121.6-billion; Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), P120.8-billion; Department of Agriculture (DA), P74.1-billion; Department of Health (DOH), P56.8-billion; Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), P56.2-billion; Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC), P37.1-billion; Department of Finance (DOF), P33.2-billion; and Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), P23.7-billion.

Abad said the DOF and the DENR “got biggest increases” while “huge investments” in the social services “continue to have the largest constantly increasing share of the budget.”

He said the proposed 2013 budget provides for performance-based bonuses, ranging from P5,000 to P35,000 per employee.

“With this budget, we want to strengthen also the accountability of public institutions and public servants to perform their mandate and therefore, we continue to deepen performance-based management systems in government,” Abad said.

The performance based bonus, he said, will be on top of the P5,000 productivity enhancement incentive (PEI) given annually during December.

Abad said government agencies will be ranked “best,” “better,” “good,” or “poor” based on performance. Those agencies that did not achieve 90 percent of its target will not be included in the bonus system. From those government agencies with high rankings, the administration will select employees who are performing well.

The 2013 National Expenditure Program will be submitted to Congress on July 24, 2012, a day after President Aquino delivers his State of the Nation Address (SONA).

Abad said the Aquino administration remains hopeful that Congress would continue the support it had given last year in the early passage of the budget.

“We hope that the same concerns and support will be demonstrated by the Congress once again. Previously, we consulted leaders of Congress about the orientation and priorities in the budget and they support the administration in the allocation that we have provided in those areas so we hope that once again, we should be able to pass this budget before Christmas,” he said.

The 2013 proposed national budget of P2.006-trillion is higher than last year by 10.5 percent or about P190-billion.

Schools use social media to communicate with students, parents

posted Jun 14, 2012, 8:23 PM by Ramil Sanchez

By KIM ARCHER & ANDREA EGER World Staff Writers 
Published: 1/22/2012  2:21 AM 
Last Modified: 1/22/2012  7:02 AM



Social media can be a valuable tool that public school teachers use to connect with and engage students in learning. 

Yet the potential for some school employees to misuse the technology has school districts across the country developing guidelines to guard against inappropriate teacher-student relationships. 

"Social media can be a good tool for communication, as long as we keep that communication on a professional level," Skiatook Superintendent Rick Thomas said. 

An attorney with the law firm that represents most school districts in northeastern Oklahoma said high-profile cases resulting in teacher firings and even lawsuits across the country demonstrate the need for establishing "common-sense" expectations. 

"Based on our experience, it is the principals and teachers who are asking for guidance. They don't want to do anything that puts their jobs in jeopardy," said Cheryl Dixon, with the firm of Rosenstein, Fist and Ringold. "A lot of the guidelines we give are common sense - use good judgment, respect appropriate boundaries." 

Right to free speech

While school employees have the same free-speech rights as any other citizens, case law does allow school districts to address off-campus behavior if it is disruptive or potentially disruptive on campus, she explained. 

For example, a Massachusetts teacher was forced to resign in August 2010 after she called students "germbags" and referred to parents as "arrogant and snobby" on Facebook. 

And in January 2007, a high school art teacher in Virginia was fired after a YouTube video of him creating print art using his buttocks while wearing nothing but a thong, a towel on his head and fake nose and glasses made its way to the school. 

"They do have the right to speak out on matters of public concern, but one of the biggest areas of concern is venting or communicating personal frustrations," Dixon said. "A good question to ask is if a fellow teacher, administrator or even a parent or student saw that, would they get upset about it? Will it compromise their effectiveness in the classroom?" 

In addition to social-networking sites, such as Facebook and Myspace, school districts' guidelines and policies apply to personal blogs and websites, plus micro-blogging sites such as Twitter, and even text messaging. 

Because the Internet has become an important tool for communicating, some schools have procedures for allowing teachers and administrators to operate class Facebook pages. 

"Since most schools block access to social-networking sites, some will even grant access from school computers. It's better this way because administrators can get on and look and so can parents," Dixon said. 

1-10 of 21